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Creating a New Continent now it's possible.




Be that as it may, why stop at artificial islands when you can manufacture a whole landmass? Such was the fantasy of German engineer and megaproject pioneer Herman Sörgel (1888-1952). Writing in his exceptionally persuasive book, Engineers' Dreams, Sörgel concocted an arrangement to make the new mainland of Atlantropa by damming the Strait of Gibraltar and the Dardanelles. This would remove the Mediterranean Sea from the sea, dropping its water level nearly many meters through vanishing. The subsequent distinction in ocean levels would be utilized to create hydroelectric power, and offer a capable answer for Europe's vitality issues.

The plan would make 3.5 million square kilometers of arable land along the shores and give overland access to Africa. Furthermore, by damming the Congo River, the arrangement would take into consideration the water system of the Sahara Desert and the production of monstrous manufactured lakes in the African inside. (Above picture: Artist's impression of Atlantropa (Credit: Lttiz/CC BY 3.0); inset picture take from Sörgel's Engineers' Dreams)

In any case, as verified by Kees Gispen in Project Muse, Sörgel's idealistic arrangement was not just horribly unlikely, it was likewise an outflow of the mid twentieth Century European expansionist motivation:

The subject that motivated Sörgel's vision was unbounded mechanical good faith married to profound social negativity — geopolitical, statistic, racial — about Europe's future in the consequence of World War I. Sörgel trusted that the war had lethally undermined Europe's position on the planet, debilitating it from the east with abounding Asiatic crowds — a "yellow danger" going to immerse Europe — and from the west with the greedy dynamism of American free enterprise. As Sörgel and his little band of adherents saw it, just the acknowledgment of Atlantropa would give Europe the quality to wind up plainly a "third drive" and keep up its worldwide remaining against Asia and America.

Irritatingly, and as Gispen calls attention to, "the similitudes between Hitler's answer for Germany's issues and Sörgel's appear to be maybe considerably more noteworthy than their disparities."

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Creating a New Continent now it's possible.




Be that as it may, why stop at artificial islands when you can manufacture a whole landmass? Such was the fantasy of German engineer and megaproject pioneer Herman Sörgel (1888-1952). Writing in his exceptionally persuasive book, Engineers' Dreams, Sörgel concocted an arrangement to make the new mainland of Atlantropa by damming the Strait of Gibraltar and the Dardanelles. This would remove the Mediterranean Sea from the sea, dropping its water level nearly many meters through vanishing. The subsequent distinction in ocean levels would be utilized to create hydroelectric power, and offer a capable answer for Europe's vitality issues.

The plan would make 3.5 million square kilometers of arable land along the shores and give overland access to Africa. Furthermore, by damming the Congo River, the arrangement would take into consideration the water system of the Sahara Desert and the production of monstrous manufactured lakes in the African inside. (Above picture: Artist's impression of Atlantropa (Credit: Lttiz/CC BY 3.0); inset picture take from Sörgel's Engineers' Dreams)

In any case, as verified by Kees Gispen in Project Muse, Sörgel's idealistic arrangement was not just horribly unlikely, it was likewise an outflow of the mid twentieth Century European expansionist motivation:

The subject that motivated Sörgel's vision was unbounded mechanical good faith married to profound social negativity — geopolitical, statistic, racial — about Europe's future in the consequence of World War I. Sörgel trusted that the war had lethally undermined Europe's position on the planet, debilitating it from the east with abounding Asiatic crowds — a "yellow danger" going to immerse Europe — and from the west with the greedy dynamism of American free enterprise. As Sörgel and his little band of adherents saw it, just the acknowledgment of Atlantropa would give Europe the quality to wind up plainly a "third drive" and keep up its worldwide remaining against Asia and America.

Irritatingly, and as Gispen calls attention to, "the similitudes between Hitler's answer for Germany's issues and Sörgel's appear to be maybe considerably more noteworthy than their disparities."